Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Teaching Your Child To Apologize

From infant to toddler, your children, have been studying the world around them and have learned the many emotions and actions associated with them. For instance, your child should understand that tears mean sadness, smiles mean happy, laughs mean funny etc. While this may seem like an easy feat for you remember your child is new to the world of empathy and emotions. They live in the moment with a me, me, me attitude. Which is all normal at this developmental stage of life.

Read more about:  Teaching Your Child to Apologize 

Friday, August 29, 2014

Am I Crazy?

I think the first thing we should focus on is why you typed that into a search engine and how you wound up here. From there we can focus on the answers to the question; Am I crazy?

Feeling blue?
Did something major in your life just change? Death of a loved one? Mourning a relationship status? Missing a loved one? When it comes to being sad, sadness is a healthy emotion and doesn't necessarily mean your crazy. It means you have the ability to feel, which is a far from crazy. Feeling blue with nothing to attribute it too? Can you ask yourself, "why am I feeling blue?" Did you come up with a pretty sound answer? Would other's feel blue over a similar situation. If the answer is yes, it's pretty safe to assume your blue mood will lift with time.

Feeling hyper?
Did something amazing just happen? Are you high on life? Are you high on cocaine or another mind altering substance? Did you just skydive? Eat a ton of sugar followed by a Red Bull? Chances are your mania is attributed to something listed above or similar. Again, ask yourself are these emotions acceptable for the situation at hand?

Quirky?
Are you quirky? We all are. We all have little things that we do to put ourselves at ease. Doesn't mean were obsessed with it. Does your quirk interfere with your daily lifestyle? Must you turn the light off and on 14 times before entering a room? Do you rearrange things by color, number, shape, etc. from food to clothing? Or is it something much less daunting like experiencing an intense need to wash your hands before every meal? Do these tasks take up large amounts of your day or do you feel anxiety if you don't complete these tasks?

Paranoia?
How severe is it? Are you confined to your house because of the recent outbreak of SARS, bird flu, Ebola, or (insert recent CDC scare here)? Are you extra cautious because your convinced your neighbor is an FBI spy who has tapped into your phone for information? Or are you just plain concerned with the well being of yourself and/or family, friends, etc. for a likely, legitimate reason? For instance, the neighbors dog is aggressive and you fear for your safety when walking passed their home?

Hearing Voices, experiencing hallucinations, or delusions? 
We all talk to ourselves. This is hardly the same thing as hearing voices.
 Hearing voices, experiencing hallucinations or delusions is cause for concern. This means that signals in your brain are crossing and your brains inner interpreter is a bit off target. Even symptoms as rare as this can be a sign of other things. It does not necessarily mean your domed to a life of insanity. It means you need to bring up these concerns to your Dr. So he or she can run the appropriate testing and help get your brain back on the right track.

Truth be told since you Googled this and arrived at this page your most likely not as crazy as you think you are. Everyone's a little bit crazy, now and then. We all have triggers that set us off, bother us, or send us into a tale spin of emotions and that's normal. To an extent. We are human beings, social creatures, with the ability to think, feel, and perceive things as our brain sees fit. When our emotions are abnormal for a given situation it can be cause for concern and is something that should be discussed with your Dr.

If you or a loved one is feeling suicidal please do not wait and seek help immediately. Call the Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1800-273-8255. Suicide is a very permanent solution to a temporary problem. Suicide Prevention Lifeline 


Thursday, May 2, 2013

What is AD/HD?

AD/HD in Teens Explained

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a group of symptoms focused on one's attention span or lack there of.

Symptoms of AD/HD

  • Easily distracted
  • Irritable
  • lacks concentration
  • Hyperactive
  • Impulsive
  • carelessness or rushing through tasks
  • difficulty finishing projects
  • forgetfulness
  • racing thoughts apparent through conversation
  • procrastination

During teen years, especially as the hormonal changes of adolescence are going on, symptoms of AD/HD may intensify or change dramatically warranting an additional or different diagnosis.

More on AD/HD in Teens.